Aircraft | Gloster Meteor (1 of 2)

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Gloster F.9/40 Meteor (DG202/G) at Cosford - Click for Full Image

Prototype Gloster F.9/40 Meteor (DG202/G) at Cosford is the first F9/40 manufactured. Of the 12 ordered, only 12 F9/40's were built; the G of the serial number indicated that the aircraft carried secret equipment and should be guarded when not airborne. The early prototypes had engine problems; this aircraft was the 5th prototype to fly.

(Picture March 2003)


 

Gloster Meteor F4 (EE531) at Midland Air Air Museum - Click for Full Image

Gloster Meteor F4 (EE531) at Midland Air Air Museum.

(Picture June 2003)


 
    

Gloster Meteor T.7 (VZ634) at Newark Air Museum - Click for Full Image

Gloster Meteor T.7 (VZ634) at Newark Air Museum was built in 1949 and initially joined 247 Squadron. This two-seater trainer version of the Meteor F.4 then joined 609 Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force in October 1955. It later served with 141 and 41 Squadron before being put in long term storage with 5 MU in 1964. It arrived at Newark in 1985.

(Picture May 2003)


  
Gloster Meteor FR.9 (VZ608) at Newark Air Museum - Click for Full Image

The Gloster Meteor FR.9 (VZ608) at Newark Air Museum is a reconnaissance fighter version of the Meteor with a modified F.8 airframe and the camera mountings from the F.4. This aircraft originally served with 208 Squadron before being used for engine test-bed duties. It arrived at Newark in 1970.

(Picture May 2003)


 

Gloster Meteor F8 (WK864) at Yorkshire Air Museum - Click for Full Image

Although it carries the colours of 616 Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, Gloster Meteor F8 (WK864) at Yorkshire Air Museum did not actually fly with that squadron. It entered service in 1954 with 11 Squadron of the RAF and later served with 604 Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. It arrived at Elvington in 1996 having been the gate guardian at Finningley since 1988. 

(Picture February 2003)


 
Gloster Meteor F8 (WK991) at Duxford - Click for Full Image

Gloster Meteor F8 (WK991) at Duxford previously served with 56, 46 and 13 Squadrons.

(Picture March 2003)


 
Gloster Meteor T7 (WA634) at Cosford - Click for Full Image

Gloster Meteor T7 (WA634) at Cosford which was used for ejector seat trials by Martin-Baker Ltd from 1952. This is effectively a T71/2 as it includes the T8 tail which was more stable than that of the T7. Martin-Baker still employ two Meteors for ejection trials, WA638 and WL419. The former of these is the oldest aircraft still on the military register having served over 50 years. These aircraft are still used by Martin-Baker for a number of reasons: they have two centrifugal engines which provides insurance against bird strikes and engine failure; keep engine air flow away from the ejector-seat area and are relatively cheap to operate. They are likely to be operated for many years yet. WA634 was used for the world's first ground level ejection test and the first live test of a rocket-powered ejection seat. It was retired in 1962 and arrived at Cosford in 1986.

(Picture March 2003)


 
Gloster Meteor F8 Prone Position (WK935) at Royal Air Force Museum, Cosford - Click for Full Image

Gloster Meteor F8 Prone Position (WK935) at Royal Air Force Museum, Cosford. This aircraft was originally a Meteor F8 and was converted to investigate the possible benefits of a pilot not sitting upright to reduce the effects of high 'g' manoeuvres. The aircraft flew 99 flights but was never flown solo from the prone position. The advent of 'anti-G' flying suits and the negative aspects of flying from the prone position put an end to the programme.

(Picture June 2003)

 

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