Aircraft | Supermarine Spitfire (2 of 2)

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Supermarine Spitfire T9 (ML407) at Duxford - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire T9 (ML407/G-LFIX) pictured on static display at the May 2003 Air Display at Duxford. This aircraft was originally built in the spring of 1944 at Castle Bromwich as an LF Mk9c and was received by 485 Squadron in May 1944. Flying nearly 140 missions with 485 Squadron this was the first allied aircraft to shoot down an enemy aircraft on D-Day when it claimed a Ju88. Following operations with 345 and 332 Squadron it went into storage after the war. Converted to a two-seater trainer in 1950, it flew with the Irish Air Corps until 1960 and then became a training airframe. Arriving back in England in the late 1960's it was acquired by Nick Grace and restored back to flying condition, taking to the air again in 1985.

(Picture May 2003)


 
Supermarine Spitfire Mk14e (RN201/G-BSKP) - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire Mk14e (RN201/G-BSKP). Like TD248, this aircraft is painted in 41 Squadron racing colours and is operated by the Aircraft Restoration Company at Duxford. This ex-Belgian Air Force Gate Guardian is fitted with a Rolls-Royce Griffon engine and was subject to a major restoration by the Aircraft Restoration Company - flying again for the first time just two months before Flying Legends 2002.

(Picture July 2002)


 

Supermarine Spitfire Mk14e (SM832/G-WWII) - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire Mk14c (SM832/G-WWII). This aircraft was an Indian Air Force relic that was recovered in the 1970's and was re-built by the Fighter Collection at Duxford. Until recently it was French-registered as F-AZSJ until returning to the Fighter Collection in March 2002. Although present at Flying Legends 2002, this picture was taken at the September 2002 Air Show at Duxford.

(Picture September 2002)


 

Supermarine Spitfire Mk14e (MV293/G-OXVI) is painted as MV268 - Click for Full Image

Another recovered Indian Air Force relic is Supermarine Spitfire Mk14e (MV293/G-OXVI) is painted as MV268. It is operated by the Fighter Collection at Duxford.

(Picture August 2003)


 
Supermarine Spitfire Mk16 (TD248/G-OXVI) - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire Mk16 (TD248/G-OXVI). This aircraft is painted in 41 Squadron post-war racing colours and was rebuilt after a flying accident by Historic Flying Limited.

(Picture March 2003)


Supermarine Spitfire Mk16 (TE462) at the Museum of Flight - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire Mk16 (TE462) at the Museum of Flight - East Fortune. This Spitfire did not serve operationally in World War II. Delivered to No.39 Maintenance Unit (MU) at Colerne in June 1945 it was stored until 1950 when it was moved to No.33 MU at Lyneham. Later in 1950 it joined the Station Flight at Finningley and also served at the No.1 Flying Refresher School. It ended it's operational career at No.29 MU at High Ercall in 1955 and then spent time as a Gate Guard at Ouston. It arrived at East Fortune in 1971.    

(Picture August 2003)


 
Supermarine Spitfire LF XVIE (RW393) at the Royal Air Force Museum, Cosford - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire LF XVIE (RW393) at the Royal Air Force Museum, Cosford.

(Picture July 2002)


 

Supermarine Spitfire Mk18 (SM845) at Duxford - Click for Full Image

Airworthy Supermarine Spitfire Mk18 (SM845) at Duxford, April 2002. This aircraft is operated by Historic Flying Limited.

(Picture April 2002)


 

Spitfire Mk24 at Duxford - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire Mk24 (VN485) at Duxford, September 2001 in a post-WW2 silver colour scheme. This Spitfire served with the Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force and also spent some time on display in Hong Kong before returning to the UK. It arrived at Duxford in 1989.

(Picture August 2002)


 
Supermarine Spitfire F24 (K9942)  at the Royal Air Force Museum, Hendon - Click for Full Image

Supermarine Spitfire F24 (PK724) at the Royal Air Force Museum, Hendon. This aircraft was first flown in February 1946 and was delivered to 33MU at Lynham in the October. Following modifications by Westland Aircraft Ltd it arrived at 9MU at Cosford in February 1950. Late in 1954 it became a non-effective airframe and moved to RAF Norton, Sheffield later the next year for instructional purposes. It served as a Gate Guard at RAF Gaydon before arriving at the Royal Air Force Museum in May 1971. In total, this aircraft amassed only 7 hours flight time.

(Picture November 2002)

 
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